If Atlanta is the capital of the new American south, Salvador da Bahia will be the new capital of a revitalized northeastern Brazil.  The capital of Bahia will experience facelift after facelift in the coming decade.  But let’s hope some of the city’s spectacular architecture is preserved.

Portuguese colonial architecture in the city’s old center, or pelourinho, complements a vibe that is more African than Latin; Mannerist architecture graces old cathedrals; neoclassical design soars above this city of almost 4 million people; and even mid-century structures, faded yet tattered, remind us why we love Brazil at so many levels.

It has been over a year since our trip to Salvador for Carnaval, but the city’s lusty, musty, and yes, often rusty infrastructure still pulls at my heart strings.  It may be the capital of a new Brazil, but I hope it still remains the country’s spiritual heart.

View of the port of Salvador

View of the port of Salvador

Utility lines dance with a street lamp, Salvador da Bahia

Utility lines dance with a street lamp, Salvador da Bahia

beach in the neighborhood of Barra, Salvador

beach in the neighborhood of Barra, Salvador

Facade of customs house, Salvador

Facade of customs house, Salvador

Lobby of apartment building, Vitoria, Salvador

Lobby of apartment building, Vitoria, Salvador

Street scene outside Salvador's old center (pelourinho)

Street scene outside Salvador's old center (pelourinho)

Salvador harbor

Salvador harbor

About The Author

Leon Kaye

Leon Kaye is the founder and editor of GreenGoPost.com. Based in California, he specializes in social media consulting and strategic communications. A journalist and writer since 2009, his work has appeared on Triple Pundit , The Guardian's Sustainable Business site and has appeared on Inhabitat and Earth911. His focus is making the business case for sustainability and corporate social responsibility. Areas of interest include the <a Middle East, sustainable development in The Balkans, Brazil and Korea. He was a new media journalism fellow at the International Reporting Project, for which he covered child survival in India during February 2013. Contact him at leon@greengopost.com. You can also reach out via Twitter (Leon Kaye) and Instagram (GreenGoPost). Since 2013, he has spent much of his time in Abu Dhabi, UAE, working with Masdar, the emirate's renewable energy company. He lives in Fresno, California.