Montevideo is one of my most favorite cities, mostly because it is the un-capitol. Rustic, bohemian and friendly, my travel experiences in Montevideo felt more like a visit to a quaint provincial outpost than a center of government power. Masterpieces of architecture such as the Palacio Salvo stand tall over the city’s neoclassical, post-modern, mid-century and occasional art deco treasures. And then there is the home of the country’s parliament.

The Palacio Legislativo stands tall about three kilometers from the city center. With Italian architect Vittorio Meano leading its construction, it took over 20 years for Palacio Legislativo to reach its completion in 1925. Intricate reliefs on the outside and stunning sculptures inside reflect the country’s might in the early 20th century. And as Uruguay’s economy strengthens due in part to its resilient farming sector, this stellar temple of democracy shines in a country that despite setbacks and hiccups, still embodies a country that is a symbol of hope in the Americas.

Montevideo, parliament, Uruguay, Palacio Legislativo, architecture, neoclassical architecture, art deco, Vittorio Meano, italian architects, travel

Tours of the building are generally available in the afternoon

Montevideo, parliament, Uruguay, Palacio Legislativo, architecture, neoclassical architecture, art deco, Vittorio Meano, italian architects, travel

Entrance to the Palacio Legislativo, home of the nation's legislative branch

Montevideo, parliament, Uruguay, Palacio Legislativo, architecture, neoclassical architecture, art deco, Vittorio Meano, italian architects, travel

A walk around the Palacio Legislativo breaks up the trip between the city center and waterfront

Photos courtesy Leon Kaye

About The Author

Leon Kaye

Leon Kaye is the founder and editor of GreenGoPost.com. Based in California, he is a business writer and consultant. His work is has also appeared on Triple Pundit , The Guardian's Sustainable Business site and has appeared on Inhabitat and Earth911. His focus is making the business case for sustainability and corporate social responsibility. He's pictured here in Qatar, one of the Middle East countries in which he takes a keen interest because of its transformation into a post-oil economy. Other areas of interest include sustainable development in The Balkans, Brazil and Korea. He was a new media journalism fellow at the International Reporting Project, for which he covered child survival in India during February 2013. Contact him at leon@greengopost.com. You can also reach out via Twitter (@LeonKaye) and Instagram (GreenGoPost). As of October 2013, he now lives and works in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.