Brazil’s economic transformation the past several years, including its shift from debtor to creditor nation, is in part due to the development of its cerrado.  There is a dark side, however, to the cerrado’s reinvention from wild savannah to agribusiness giant that supplies much of the world’s soy, corn, and beef.  According to the World Wildlife Fund, this region that covers one-fifth of Brazil and contains 5% of all life on earth is threatened by commercial farming and the fertilizers that make agriculture possible--much of it to produce animal feed.

I have written about the dilemma over the cerrado on The Guardian.  While the Amazon has long attracted much of the world’s environmental activism, the Brazilian version of the prairie has remained under the radar.  No longer is that the case--the WWF’s UK division is trying to win the hearts and minds of consumers in the United Kingdom with this short film that urges them to send emails to supermarkets to source soy products that are not linked to the cerrado’s deforestation:

Save the Cerrado from WWF-UK on Vimeo.

We welcome a welcome debate on this valuable region.  Please share your thoughts.  In the meantime, enjoy the brilliant photos of the shadows that emerge throughout the cerrado.

An Armadillo shadow in the cerrado, courtesy of the WWF

An Armadillo shadow in the cerrado, courtesy of the WWF

Shadows of the cerrado's landscape

Shadows of the cerrado's landscape

Anteater in Brazil's cerrado

Anteater in Brazil's cerrado

About The Author

Leon Kaye

Leon Kaye is the founder and editor of GreenGoPost.com. Based in California, he is a business writer and consultant. His work is has also appeared on Triple Pundit , The Guardian's Sustainable Business site and has appeared on Inhabitat and Earth911. His focus is making the business case for sustainability and corporate social responsibility. He's pictured here in Qatar, one of the Middle East countries in which he takes a keen interest because of its transformation into a post-oil economy. Other areas of interest include sustainable development in The Balkans, Brazil and Korea. He was a new media journalism fellow at the International Reporting Project, for which he covered child survival in India during February 2013. Contact him at leon@greengopost.com. You can also reach out via Twitter (@LeonKaye) and Instagram (GreenGoPost). As of October 2013, he now lives and works in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.